Go Figure by Jo Edwards {Review}

Go Figure by Jo Edwards {Review}Title: Go Figure
Author: Johanna Edwards
Publisher: Simon Pulse on October 23, 2007
Format: Paperback, 271 pages
Source: Purchased
2 Stars
Summary

Ryan is not obsessing….

But she does want to lose weight. Ever since she was outted as a “fat girl” at chearleading camp in fifth grade, Ryan’s been on a mission to shed more than a few pounds.

Lately she’s also on the hunt for a new relationship. Now that her ex- boyfriend is a rock star – currently posing on the cover of Rolling Stone – Ryan seriously needs to move on. They haven’t spoken in months, but in the magazine Noah’s wearing the bracelet Ryan gave him. She can’t help wondering what that means…Not that she wants him back or anything.

No, Ryan’s plan is to make the most of senior year. After all, she’s popular, funny, a talented photographer…she’s got a lot going for her. So it’s not all about losing weight or gaining a boyfriend. It’s about getting what she wants. And it’s about time.

My thoughts

Ryan is on the heavy side, and that’s always been a problem for her. Not for anybody else, mind you, just her. She has an ex-boyfriend who liked her just the way she is. Of course, he’s now a famous rock star, and nobody will let her forget that. Her best friend (also on the heavier side) is away until the new school year, but Ryan’s excited to spend her summer at a super-exclusive photography workshop at the local college.

Ryan was obsessed with her weight. To her, everything in her life came down to what she weighed. No matter what else was going on, she found a way to relate it to her weight. While annoying at times, it’s probably pretty realistic for someone at that age to feel that way. Josh was a typical image-obsessed teenage boy. Until he wasn’t. Noah, the rockstar ex-boyfriend, was a jerk. Maybe he was nicer before he became famous, but I didn’t see it. It made it hard to see why Ryan was still crushing on him.

We didn’t get to know Ryan’s BFFF (Best Fat Friend Forever) until she came back from her summer away, and when she came back, she wasn’t a very nice person. Why were they friends? Because fatties have to stick together. Since they were the 2 biggest girls in school, everyone (including the two of them) just assumed they would be best friends. I hated that.

Although I quickly tired of Ryan’s obsession with her weight, I still managed to feel sorry for her every once in a while. When you’re young, everything is so important and life altering.

This was an easy, fast read, but that came at the expense of plot and character development. Everybody learned their lesson by the end, but they seemed to do it by magic. One day, they just woke up and knew that weight wasn’t everything, that it’s not OK to judge a book by its cover, drugs are bad, etc. We didn’t get to watch as they came to these realizations themselves.

The sum up

A quick story with a lot of potential, but it lacks characterization and plot development.

About the author


Johanna Edwards is the nationally bestselling author of the novels The Next Big Thing, How to Be Cool, Your Big Break, Love Undercover, and Go Figure. Her books have also been published in Russia, Spain, Brazil and The Netherlands.

Johanna is a graduate of The University of Memphis (BA ’01) department of journalism.

Johanna, 34 years old, lives in Memphis where she is hard at work on her next novel.

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45 Pounds (More or Less) by K.A. Barson {Review}

45 Pounds (More or Less) by K.A. Barson {Review}Title: 45 Pounds (More or Less)
Author: K.A. Barson
Publisher: Viking Juvenile on July 11th 2013
Format: Hardcover, 272 pages
Source: Book Divas
4 Stars
Summary

She is 16.
And a size 17.
Her perfect mother is a size 6.
Her Aunt Jackie is getting married in 10 weeks, and wants Ann to be her bridesmaid.
So Ann makes up her mind: Time to lose 45 pounds (more or less) in 2 1/2 months.

Welcome to the world of infomercial diet plans, wedding dance lessons, embarrassing run-ins with the cutest guy Ann’s ever seen—-and some surprises about her NOT-so-perfect mother.

And there’s one more thing. It’s all about feeling comfortable in your own skin-—no matter how you add it up!

My thoughts

Ann has been overweight for a long time. She’s tried various diets and exercise programs, but none stick. When her aunt asks her to stand up at her wedding, Ann decides now is the time to get serious about losing weight. She sees an informercial for the Next Big Thing and decides that’s the key. As she’s trying to lose the weight, she’s also dealing with new friends, jealous friends, a new crush, her absentee dad, a new job and a very critical mother.

In the beginning, Ann was a bit of a non-character. Thanks to her mother’s constant nagging, and her own self-image, Ann was afraid to be herself, or to have much of a personality. She wanted to blend in and be unnoticed. As the story goes on and she learns to open up and make friends and talk to people, she really blossoms into a person whom I would totally be friends with.

One of her new friends, Raynee, was a great person for Ann to get to know and I liked her character. I also liked Ann’s crush, who was a cutie patootie and so nice (and forgiving!). Ann’s family was your average blended family and they were all believable, though the mom was a bit… off. Her issues weren’t the kind that would go on unnoticed in real life as long as they did in the story.

The plot was entirely (and unfortunately) believable. Who among us hasn’t, at one time or another, decided we needed to lose some weight? Thought that everything would get better if we could drop a few pounds? Imagined that this new diet is the one that will solve our weight problem once and for all? We know better, but Anne still believes, and it was painful to read as she learned the truth.

You know going in what the final lesson will be, but it was never got preachy. There was a lot of humor in the story; I loved Ann’s snarkiness, and her grandmother’s bad attitude. I laughed out loud several times. K.A. Barson not only writes the funny scenes, but she can bring the sad, too, without it being overwhelming. Ann’s inner dialogue was one I think everyone can relate to.

The sum up

I found this to be honest and fun; a perfect story for girls, both the young and the not-so young.

About the author


K.A. Barson graduated from Vermont College of Fine Arts with an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults. She and her husband live in Jackson, Michigan, surrounded by kids, grandkids, unruly dogs, and too many pairs of shoes.

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Review + Giveaway: The Disappearing Girl by Heather Topham Wood

Title: The Disappearing Girl
Author: Heather Topham Wood
Publisher: May 7th 2013 by
Format: Paperback, 248 pages
Source: AToMR Tours
3 owls

Summary

Kayla Marlowe is slowly vanishing…

Last year, Kayla’s world imploded. Her beloved father died, leaving her alone with a narcissistic mother who is quick to criticize her daughter’s appearance. During her winter break from college, Kayla’s dangerous obsession with losing weight begins.

Kayla feels like her world changes for the better overnight. Being skinny seems to be the key to the happiness she has desperately been seeking. Her mother and friends shower her with compliments, telling her how fantastic she looks. Kayla is starving, but no one knows it.

Cameron Bennett explodes into Kayla’s life. He’s sexy and kind—he has every quality she has been looking for in a guy. As Cameron grows closer to Kayla and learns of how far she’s willing to go to stay thin, he becomes desperate to save her.

Kayla’s struggles with anorexia and bulimia reach a breaking point and she is forced to confront her body image issues in order to survive. She wonders if Cameron could be the one to help heal her from the pain of her past.

New Adult Contemporary-Ages 17+ due to language and sexual situations.

My thoughts

Kayla’s father died last year, leaving no buffer between Kayla and her younger sister, and their egotistical mother. Kayla is away at college, and though she enjoys being on her own, she feels guilty for leaving her sister at home, as well as pressure to live up to her mother’s unrealistic expectations.

I enjoyed this book as a whole, though I had a few issues with its believability.

Kayla was an interesting character, both strong and weak at the same time. She was close to her father and missed him terribly, yet she had to stay strong for her sister. She knew the way her mother treated them was wrong, yet she fell victim to her insults. She realized how sick she was, yet was unable to stop it.

Her little sister managed to stay strong, and I was proud of her for that. Their mom was a nightmare, and more than a few times I wished I could slap her. Cameron was pretty much her saving grace. He was the only one who was willing to do something about how she was treating herself, which was kind of sad, when you think about it.

With Cameron seated next to me, his hand resting on my knee, I relaxed. Cameron was a salve to all the wounds inside me. But as I thought it over, I had a sense of foreboding. This couldn’t be good, the way I was becoming dependent upon him. I should be strong, self-reliant.

I really liked that she recognized her path maybe wasn’t heading where it should. She knew what she was doing was wrong, but she was powerless to stop it. That also described her anorexia perfectly. It was a slippery slope and Heather Topham Wood illustrated that perfectly. You don’t wake up one day and say, hey, I think I’ll stop eating. It’s a gradual process and not always so easy to recognize, in yourself or someone else.

I enjoyed the fact that Cameron didn’t give up on Kayla, no matter how much she pushed him away, but I’m not entirely convinced that would happen in real life. He hadn’t known her long enough to really care for her, yet he was willing to do pretty much anything to make her well.

Also, the lessons are learned too quickly and easily for my taste. View Spoiler »

As I was reading, I kept thinking, “this could use a little polish.” With maybe a touch of editing, I think it could move to a 4-owl book for me. Nothing big (besides the above-mentioned issues), but just some general shaping up.

The sum up

Sad and eye-opening, this is a mostly realistic look at how sneaky and devastating eating disorders can be.

 

About the author

Heather Topham Wood’s obsession with novels began in childhood while growing up in a shore town in New Jersey. Writing since her teens, she recently returned to penning novels after a successful career as a freelance writer. She’s the author of the paranormal romance Second Sight series and the standalone The Disappearing Girl.

Heather graduated from the College of New Jersey in 2005 and holds a bachelor’s degree in English. Her freelance work has appeared in publications such as USA Today, Livestrong.com, Outlook by the Bay and Step in Style magazine. She resides in Trenton, New Jersey with her husband and two sons. Besides writing, Heather is a pop culture fanatic and has an obsession with supernatural novels and TV shows.

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Review: True by Erin McCarthy

Title: True
Author: Erin McCarthy
Publisher: May 7th 2013 by InterMix
Format: ebook, 238 pages
Source: NetGalley
3 owls

Summary

When Rory Macintosh’s roommates find out that their studious and shy friend has never been with a guy, they decide that, as an act of kindness they’ll help her lose her virginity by hiring confident, tattooed bad boy Tyler Mann to do the job…unbeknownst to Rory.

Tyler knows he’s not good enough for Rory. She’s smart, doctor smart, while he’s barely scraping by at his EMT program, hoping to pull his younger brothers out of the hell their druggy mother has left them in. But he can’t resist taking up her roommates on an opportunity to get to know her better. There’s something about her honesty that keeps him coming back when he knows he shouldn’t…

Torn between common sense and desire, the two find themselves caught up in a passionate relationship. But when Tyler’s broken family threatens to destroy his future, and hers, Rory will need to decide whether to cut her ties to his risky world or follow her heart, no matter what the cost…

My thoughts

Rory’s nerdy and shy and not able to make friends easily. Luckily, she’s managed to bond with her 2 dorm mates, even though they’re very different. They help her get out of her shell a bit. When they find out she’s a (gasp!) virgin, they secretly pay Tyler, who happens to be a booty call for one of them, to deflower her. At first, Rory’s unsure why Tyler is suddenly paying so much attention to her, but she likes it.

Rory was a funny person, she had a great sense of humor, though she sometimes had a hard time letting her hair down. She lost her mother when she was young, and you could tell that played a part in her personality. She loved her father very much, but they weren’t a loving family. She was smart and confident in her abilities.

Tyler was your typical bad boy – tattooed, dangerous, ladies’ man with a secretive home life that made him want to protect himself from further hurt, but a real softy on the inside. He really did have a horrible home life, no father and a drug-addicted, abusive mother. Luckily, he had his older brother to help him out, and his younger brothers to keep him grounded. He made some stupid decisions throughout the story (not the least of which was accepting money to take a girl’s virginity), but you could tell that underneath he was a pretty decent guy.

Rory’s roommates were pretty nice, until you realized that they’d paid someone to sleep with her. Why they felt it was so necessary for Rory to have sex was unclear. I thought that was a pretty underhanded thing, and it colored my opinion of them for the rest of the book.

The plot is pretty repetitive these days: girl is almost raped, boy comes to her rescue, they fall in love. Don’t get me wrong, though, it was entertaining. It was a little disappointing, however, that the near-rape wasn’t dealt with. No police were called, no counseling was sought, nothing. It was spoken of a few times immediately after, then once or twice later, then nada. That was a missed opportunity, as far as I’m concerned.

The story moved along at a brisk pace, and that was nice. It made it easier to overlook the parts that bothered me, such as Rory’s inconsistent behaviors, her roommates’ attempt to prostitute her out and Tyler’s inability to simply talk about what was bothering him. The romance felt authentic, like 2 college kids getting to know each other and learning to trust one another. The ending was a bit rushed, it could have used more attention. Otherwise, it was a nice quick read.

The sum up

Predictable but entertaining.

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Drowning Instinct by Ilsa J. Bick {Audio Review}

Drowning Instinct by Ilsa J. Bick {Audio Review}Title: Drowning Instinct
Author: Ilsa J. Bick
Publisher: Brilliance Audio on February 1, 2012
Format: Audiobook, 9 hrs and 46 mins
Source: Purchased
5 Stars
Summary

There are stories where the girl gets her prince, and they live happily ever after. (This is not one of those stories.)

Jenna Lord’s first sixteen years were not exactly a fairytale. Her father is a controlling psycho and her mother is a drunk. She used to count on her older brother—until he shipped off to Afghanistan. And then, of course, there was the time she almost died in a fire.

There are stories where the monster gets the girl, and we all shed tears for his innocent victim. (This is not one of those stories either.)

Mitch Anderson is many things: A dedicated teacher and coach. A caring husband. A man with a certain… magnetism.

And there are stories where it’s hard to be sure who’s a prince and who’s a monster, who is a victim and who should live happily ever after. (These are the most interesting stories of all.)

Drowning Instinct is a novel of pain, deception, desperation, and love against the odds—and the rules.

My thoughts

After reading Katie’s review of Drowning Instinct over at Blook Girl, I picked up the audio version, and I’m so glad I did.

Jenna is rescued from a near-drowning and while in the hospital, an officer gives her a tape recorder and asks her to record what happened, how she ended up in the frozen lake. So she starts at the beginning: her troubled home life, her arrival at a new school and everything that happens after. She pulls no punches and spares no details.

Jenna is a hot mess. She’s had an unfortunate upbringing which includes a fire that nearly killed her, being molested, living with a drunk mother and a super controlling father, being abandoned by her military-bound brother and self cutting. Unsurprisingly, she has some issues. She was a likable character, though. She had her moments of whining or brattiness, but she deserves some slack.

The infamous teacher, Mitch, well… I had some issues. He’s relatable and nice enough, and I understand he has his own issues, but he’s an adult. I’ve seen many reviews that say this story shows it’s not all black and white, that there are some gray areas, but I disagree. An adult is an adult is an adult. He should know better, no matter what’s going on in his life. But, let’s put that aside for now and just go with it, for the sake of this review. As a general character, I did like Mitch. He was kind and friendly and I think he truly wanted to be there for Jenna, who clearly needed someone to be on her side.

The other characters were there to be mean or bad to our 2 main characters, so we’d feel sorry for them. And they succeeded. They weren’t full characters, more like caricatures of people. But that’s okay, they served their purpose and I really just wanted to spend more time with Mitch and Jenna. Because even though I would oppose such a relationship in real life, I loved reading about it! They had some great scenes together, very sweet and romantic (if maybe a bit clinical).

Ilsa J. Bick has a way with words (not a surprise to me, having read her book Ashes), but I was still impressed with the way she weaved the story together. There was a bit of action, a lot of mystery, some romance and even witty dialogue. Several times I found myself anxious to know what happened next, and this was the only frustrating part about listening to the audio version – where I would normally skip a bit to get to the next scene, because I just couldn’t wait, I was forced to wait for the narrator to get there.

Speaking of the narrator, Kathleen McInerney did a fabulous job of bringing the story to life. At first I thought she sounded too young, but it worked and she soon became Jenna. Also, since the entire story is Jenna speaking into a microphone, there was a certain “rightness” of listening to the story, as opposed to reading it.

This is sometimes a hard story, for the subject matter, but it’s an interesting one. The writing is taut and kept me on the edge of my seat many times. And you know that bit from the book’s summary:

There are stories where the girl gets her prince, and they live happily ever after. (This is not one of those stories.)

Keep that bit in mind.

The sum up

I love everything about this book.

About the author

ilsa j. bickAmong other things, I was an English major in college and so I know that I’m supposed to write things like, “Ilsa J. Bick is .” Except I hate writing about myself in the third person like I’m not in the room. Helloooo, I’m right here . . . So let’s just say that I’m a child psychiatrist (yeah, you read that right)as well as a film scholar, surgeon wannabe (meaning I did an internship in surgery and LOVED it and maybe shoulda stuck), former Air Force major—and an award-winning, best-selling author of short stories, e-books, and novels. Believe me, no one is more shocked about this than I . . . unless you talk to my mother.

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Review: Wide Awake by Shelly Crane

Title: Wide Awake
Author: Shelly Crane
Publisher: Createspace
Format: Paperback, 218 pages
Source: Young Adult Novel Reader Blog Tours
4 owls

Summary

A girl.
A coma.
A life she can’t remember.

When Emma Walker wakes up in the hospital with no knowledge of how she got there, she learns that she’s been in a coma for six months. Strangers show up and claim to be her parents, but she can’t remember them. She can’t remember anyone. Not her friends, not even her boyfriend. Even though she can’t remember, everyone wants her to just pick up where she left off, but what she learns about the ‘old her’ makes her start to wish she’d never woken up. Her boyfriend breaks up with the new girl he’s dating to be with her, her parents want her to start planning for college, her friends want their leader back, and her physical therapist with the hazel eyes keeps his distance to save his position at the hospital.

Will she ever feel like she recognizes the girl in the mirror?

My thoughts

Emma wakes up after a six-month coma and can’t remember anything about herself. Her parents, brother, sister, boyfriend and friends all want the old Emma back, but the new Emma doesn’t know how to be their Emma. And maybe isn’t sure she really wants to be her anyway.

I liked Emma, she was fragile and yet strong at the same time. When her boyfriend pressured her to be the Emma he remembered, she managed to stand up to him and tell him that he needed to be patient. Even though he was persistent, she still stuck to her guns. I liked that she didn’t become a coward and try to please everyone all the time. Andy, said boyfriend, made it hard to know if he was a good guy or not. Sometimes, his persistence with Emma made me think he was a sweetheart who just missed his girl, but his cocky attitude made it hard to like him. Her parents were also hard nuts to crack – clearly they loved Emma, but why wouldn’t they just leave her alone instead of pushing her to be the old Emma? Emma’s physical therapist, Mason, ran hot and cold, making it hard to know whether to like him or not.

If anyone wants an example of instalove, look no further than this book. And not just from her. After Emma woke up, Mason was the only person who seemed to see her as she truly was, not who she used to be. He was one of the first faces she saw when she woke and almost instantly felt a connection to him. No matter what else was going on in her life, she felt a magnetic pull to him akin to instalove. And Mason seemed drawn to her as well. Though he was wishy washy about it, which was frustrating. We learned a bit near the end about why he felt so strongly about her, but even with that, his felt like a case of instalove as well. I’m a big fan of chemistry and attraction, but this relationship bordered on obsessive.

The book had a useless fact at the beginning of most chapters, and they were fairly interesting. They didn’t add anything to the story (though a book about useless facts does play a part), but I liked their inclusion. The novel is very well written, with plenty of interesting dialogue and scene setting. There were a few bothersome bits (the psychiatrist that only appeared in a few scenes, never to be heard from again, the instalove, the overly dramatic ending, the tattoo…), but the romance and story more than made up for them.

The sum up

Sweet and entertaining with a side of sad.

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Review: If You Find Me by Emily Murdoch

Title: If You Find Me
Author: Emily Murdoch
Publisher: March 26th 2013 by St. Martin’s Griffin
Format: Hardcover, 256 pages
Source: NetGalley
4 owls

Summary

There are some things you can’t leave behind…

A broken-down camper hidden deep in a national forest is the only home fifteen year-old Carey can remember. The trees keep guard over her threadbare existence, with the one bright spot being Carey’s younger sister, Jenessa, who depends on Carey for her very survival. All they have is each other, as their mentally ill mother comes and goes with greater frequency. Until that one fateful day their mother disappears for good, and two strangers arrive. Suddenly, the girls are taken from the woods and thrust into a bright and perplexing new world of high school, clothes and boys.

Now, Carey must face the truth of why her mother abducted her ten years ago, while haunted by a past that won’t let her go… a dark past that hides many a secret, including the reason Jenessa hasn’t spoken a word in over a year. Carey knows she must keep her sister close, and her secrets even closer, or risk watching her new life come crashing down.

My thoughts

Carey has lived in the forest with her sister Nessa, almost as long as she can remember, ever since her mother ran away from her abusive father. They live in an old camper with no running water, electricity and very little food. Carey is able to hunt squirrels and rabbits, in order for her and Nessa to have enough food. Their mother spends most of her time in town trying to score her next meth hit. Things aren’t great for them, but at least Nessa and Carey have each other. One day, after their mom has been gone for almost 2 months, Carey’s dad shows up and wants to take her home.

Carey was an amazing character – she took an awful situation and made it bearable. She was also kind of a paradox – mature far beyond her years in the forest, but when she was in the real world, she was naïve and innocent. She was a fierce mother-figure to Nessa, and saved her life in more ways than one. Nessa (also too mature for her age) was very lucky to have her. I can’t say much about the other characters without revealing too much of the plot, but I will say they were all very believable and authentic. And also, their mother rivals Nikki’s for the Worst Mother of the Decade award. Yikes.

The writing was fantastic. The scenes were so vibrant, from the broken down camper to the forest to the farm, I could picture every little detail. Even the farm dog was described in a way that made it easy for me to picture is strolling down a dirt lane, or chasing a truck.

The plot was a sad one, to be sure. The girls had lived such horrific lives, but once they were out in the world with clothes and electricity and all the food they could handle, Carey still wanted to be back in the forest, the only home she could remember. But as she learned to trust people and accept her mother for the douche canoe she truly was, her growth was practically measurable. She had to learn all about television and phones and even how to talk to other people.

This was sometimes a hard book to read, the things that Carey and Nessa went through were awful. I wanted to hug them or slap someone or just make it all better. But it was also hopeful and sweet and heartfelt.

The sum up

This is a hard one to read, but it’s worth it.

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Review: My Life After Now by Jessica Verdi

Title: My Life After Now
Author: Jessica Verdi
Publisher: April 2nd 2013 by Sourcebooks Fire
Format: Paperback, 304 pages
Source: Publisher
4 owls

Summary

Lucy just had the worst week ever. Seriously, mega bad. And suddenly, it’s all too much—she wants out. Out of her house, out of her head, out of her life. She wants to be a whole new Lucy. So she does something the old Lucy would never dream of.

And now her life will never be the same. Now, how will she be able to have a boyfriend? What will she tell her friends? How will she face her family?

Now her life is completely different…every moment is a gift. Because now she might not have many moments left.

My thoughts

Lucy and her boyfriend of a year and a half, Ty, are starring in the school’s performance of Romeo and Juliet. Lucy lost the part of Juliet to the school’s snobby prima donna, Elyse, but she’s embracing her role as Mercutio. Her two besties, Max and Courtney, are there for her no matter what. When Lucy sees that Elyse is flirting with Ty, she’s not worried. She and Ty are meant to be. Unfortunately, Ty doesn’t agree and dumps her for Elyse. And to top her crappy week off, her absentee mother shows up and Lucy’s dads let her move in with them. In an effort to forget about her life for a while, Lucy goes home with a drummer from the club she, Max and Courtney go to. After her humiliating walk of shame, she’s ready to put the whole incident behind her. When she learns she has HIV, Lucy is devastated. How will she tell everyone? Will anyone ever want to touch her again? And how long until she dies?

Lucy was a very relatable character. She was your average good girl who made a mistake. Who hasn’t done something out of character just to shake things up a bit? Usually, though, it doesn’t end as badly as it did for Lucy. And though I think the mistake she made was pretty stupid, and not one many other people would make, she was young and innocent and just didn’t know any better. But that was just one of the times, among several, I thought Lucy acted immature for her age.

She was very lucky to have the support of her two fathers, who were just about the perfect parents. They were supportive and kind and let their daughter lead her own life. And Lucy’s mom was pretty much the definition of “shitty mom.” Yikes. It’s amazing Lucy turned out as normal as she did, considering her mother. I was disappointed in the way Max and Courtney treated Lucy in the beginning. They were supposed to be such great friends, but as soon as Lucy got a little grumpy, they just gave up on her and left her behind. I loved Evan, he was so kind and truly her friend.

The dialogue was believable and honest. I especially liked how real Lucy and her fathers were once they started talking about her diagnosis. Her fathers, especially, went out of their way to talk about HIV like it wasn’t a devastating thing. They were careful not to make Lucy feel bad, or like she deserved it. Really, they were an awesome example of how parents should act in a situation like this.

I liked the writing, though I think a few things were glossed over. Lucy’s night out at the club, the time immediately after, and various situations after her diagnosis, I felt all could have used more. More discussion, more details or more depth. The plot was a unique one, I can’t recall reading one where the main character contracted HIV (not saying they aren’t out there, just that I haven’t read them). What a harsh lesson for someone to learn. The details and statistics worked into the story were scary and sad and made the book more realistic and relevant. Near the end, it got to be too preachy for my taste. It was almost like the story took on a completely different tone.

The sum up

This story has a great message wrapped up in an entertaining story.

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Other opinions

Book Passion For Life
A Backwards Story {Enter to win a copy here.}
Novels On the Run

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